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WhyBeNormal
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Quote WhyBeNormal Replybullet Topic: Generic sunblock v. tattoo-specific sunblock
    Posted: September/17/2010 at 3:20pm
Do you think it's important to use tattoo-specific sunblock like Tattoo Goo Color Guard or Tattoo Armor, or would it be good enough to just pick up some quality sunblock such as Burt's Bees Chemical-Free Sunscreen?

And if you'd go with something marketed for tattoos, which brand would you prefer?

Thanks


Edited by WhyBeNormal - September/17/2010 at 3:21pm
Avoid passing on urban legends, scams, and false information. Before you forward email, check it out at http://www.snopes.com, the Urban Legends Reference Pages.
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JClaude
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Quote JClaude Replybullet Posted: September/17/2010 at 4:02pm
I ended choosing the Neutrogena SPF100+ sunblock with some anti pore clogging element in it for my tats. I did order the Tattoo Goo Color Guard, but it is just too small for large areas. I do love the Tattoo Goo stuff and been using it for years. specially of their salve and the new Healix Gold
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LucieMay
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Quote LucieMay Replybullet Posted: September/17/2010 at 4:31pm
I used SPF 50 + on my son as a baby and it worked perfectly. If it can protect a baby's delicate skin, it can protect an adult's tattooed skin.
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Aileen101
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Quote Aileen101 Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 12:31am
sunblock is sunblock..  Higher spf the better, but brands arent really important..    The only thing I splurge on brand wise is Mac and Cheese.. KRAFT BABY!!!
dance sir... that is all, just dance.....
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metalbabe
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Quote metalbabe Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 3:39am
Originally posted by Aileen101

sunblock is sunblock..  Higher spf the better, but brands arent really important..


agreed

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bondagekitten
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Quote bondagekitten Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 5:37pm
I'd just use the best sunblock you can get, I prefer kid friendly ones that are creams as apposed to sprays and covers UVA and UVB or whatever the terms for the nasty stuff in sunlight is, I mainly hide from sunlight though.
"Take me as I am or not at all" - Ginger (from The Wildhearts)
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howies
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Quote howies Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 6:08pm
i used spf 50+ on mine and it didnt cause me any problems what so ever
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JClaude
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Quote JClaude Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 6:33pm
This might be of some interest:


Many people don't realize there's a difference between sunblock and sunscreen. True to its name, sunblock reflects the sun's rays, thereby blocking them from reaching your skin. Sunscreen absorbs rather than reflects ultraviolet (UV) radiation, explains a new edition of Skin Care and Repair, a Harvard Medical School report.

Sunblocks, such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, are highly effective in protecting against both UVA and UVB rays, the types of UV radiation that cause sunburn and skin cancer. Sunblocks often appear white on the skin. Sunscreens tend to be less visible on the skin. They usually contain benzophenones, which protect against UVA, and cinnamates and salicylates, which protect against UVB. You'll see these ingredients listed as oxybenzone, octyl salicylate, or octyl methoxycinnamate, to name a few. A major drawback of these sunscreen ingredients is that they often break down after several hours of exposure to sunlight, which means you need to reapply them.

But two new sunscreens Anthelios SX and Helioplex provide longer-lasting protection against UVA and UVB rays. Research shows that Anthelios SX, which was approved by the FDA in 2006, retains 80% of its UVA protection and 90% of its UVB protection five hours after application.

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends using sunscreen with an SPF rating of at least 15. People with fair skin or at high risk for skin cancer may want to go higher. The higher a sunscreen's SPF rating, the longer it protects against sun exposure. Products labeled "broad spectrum" often contain several different sun protection ingredients in order to cover a broad range of UV radiation.

Harvard Health Publications
Harvard Medical School 10 Shattuck St., Ste. 612
Cambridge, MA 02115
United States
http://www.health.harvard.edu
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Reason #7 For Not Getting a Tattoo:
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Quote JClaude Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 6:39pm
Originally posted by metalbabe

Originally posted by Aileen101

sunblock is sunblock..  Higher spf the better, but brands arent really important..


agreed


Actually that is wrong, and the data is worrying I would say. So, the brand is in fact VERY important.

  • Only 15% of 952 products analyzed met EWG’s criteria for safety and effectiveness, blocking both UVA and UVB radiation, remaining stable in sunlight, and containing few if any ingredients with significant known or suspected health hazards.
  • Many products lack UVA protection.
  • Sunscreens break down in the sun.
  • Questionable product claims are widespread. Many products on the market bear claims that are considered “unacceptable” or misleading under FDA’s draft sunscreen safety standards.
  • Many sunscreens contain nano-scale ingredients that raise potential concerns.
  • The U.S. lags behind other countries when it comes to products that work and are safe.
  • Some sunscreens absorb into the blood and raise safety concerns.

full article:
http://www.healthyreader.com/2008/07/07/top-10-sunscreen-brands/


oh and Kraft FTW!!


Edited by JClaude - September/18/2010 at 6:42pm
peRsOnal CreAtiVe

Reason #7 For Not Getting a Tattoo:
People will know you are running your own life, instead of listening to them!
"Sailor Jerry Collins, tattoo artist."

We are the beautiful freaks!
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TattooBox
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Quote TattooBox Replybullet Posted: September/18/2010 at 7:31pm

Just do like me. Live in a country where you never see the sun. Choose Belgium, and all your problems will be solved. Instantly.

When you have a arguement with an idiot, the most tangible proof that he's an idiot is his unability to leave peacefully a discussion that can obviously bring nothing.
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